The Large Hadron Collider will embark on a third run to uncover more cosmic secrets

The Large Hadron Collider will embark on a third run to uncover more cosmic secrets

Ten years ago, scientists were able to discover the Higgs Boson particle and help make sense of the universe using the Large Hadron Collider

They did it again in 2018, unlocking new insights on protons.

Now, with a new host of questions, they plan to restart the particle accelerator this month

to possibly better understand cosmic unknowns like dark matter.

"This is a particle that has answered some questions for us and given many others,"

Dr. Sarah Demers, a physics professor at Yale University, tells NPR.

The Higgs Boson particle was first observed when scientists at the European Center for Nuclear Research, or CERN

 spun and crashed particles together near the speed of light

They did that by using the world's largest and most powerful particle accelerator — the Large Hadron Collider.

Since 1964, physicists theorized this particle existed, but it took nearly 50 years to find evidence.

Scientists believe the Higgs field was formed a tenth of a billionth of a second

after the Big Bang and without it, stars, planets and life would not have emerged.

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